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News Archives by Year

2011 News Archive

December 16, 2011
NEH collaborative project is highlighted in "Reflections"
Download Reflections (Fall 2011)

USC once again highlights the NEH funded collaborative research project between the Moving Image Research Collections (MIRC) and the Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute (IMI) in an article published in the Fall 2011 issue of Reflections. Drs. Petrushev and Karaivanov are working with MIRC faculty, Drs. Wilsbacher and Cooper, to develop an open-source software application that directly reproduces the optical sound tracks of motion picture films from digital scans. To view this article, please visit the link above and navigate to page 12.

November 29, 2011
IMI is highlighted in the Fall/Winter issue of "In Focus"
Download In Focus (Fall/Winter 2011)

In an interview with Robert Sharpley, published in the Fall/Winter 2011 issue of In Focus, the College of Arts and Sciences highlights the creation of the Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute and Sharpley's pivotal role in making the IMI a key institute for leveraging collaborations that extend to other disciplines and providing "mathematical support to those who can benefit from it." To view this article, please visit the link above.

October 24, 2011
Blagovest Sendov, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, presents a Fall 2011 Distinguished Lecture

The Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute is honored to have two distinguished lectures as part of its Fall 2011 Distinguished Lecture Series. Following the well received distiguished lecture on "Music and Mathematics", the second highly anticipated lecture will be by Blagovest Sendov, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. Sendov will give a talk on "Rolle's Theorems for Complex Polynomials," on October 27th from 3:30 - 4:30 PM in LeConte 412. To view the abstract and for biographical information on Sendov, please visit our Distinguished Lectures page.

October 17, 2011
Vladimir Temlyakov publishes book on "Greedy Approximation"

As part of its series: Cambridge Monographs on Applied and Computational Mathematics, Cambridge University Press has published the book "Greedy Approximation" (ISBN-13: 978-1107003378) by Vladimir Temlyakov, an IMI member and a Carolina Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mathematics.

"This first book on greedy approximation gives a systematic presentation of the fundamental results. It also contains an introduction to two hot topics in numerical mathematics: learning theory and compressed sensing. Nonlinear approximation is becoming increasingly important, especially since two types are frequently employed in applications: adaptive methods are used in PDE solvers, while m-term approximation is used in image/signal/data processing, as well as in the design of neural networks. The fundamental question of nonlinear approximation is how to devise good constructive methods (algorithms) and recent results have established that greedy type algorithms may be the solution. The author has drawn on his own teaching experience to write a book ideally suited to graduate courses. The reader does not require a broad background to understand the material. Important open problems are included to give students and professionals alike ideas for further research."

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October 11, 2011
Reginald Bain, John Fitz Rogers and Fang Man, USC School of Music, will present a Fall 2011 Distinguished Lecture

The Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute is honored to have two distinguished lectures as part of its Fall 2011 Distinguished Lecture Series. The first highly anticipated lecture will be by faculty members from the USC School of Music, Reginald Bain, John Fitz Rogers and Fang Man. Each will give a 30 minute talk in this truly interdisciplinary presentation on "Music and Mathematics", scheduled for October 17th from 3:30 - 5:00 PM in LeConte 412. To view the abstract and biographical information on each speaker, please visit our Distinguished Lectures page.

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September 16, 2011
Douglas Meade and Edwin Dickey are awarded a National Science Foundation grant

Douglas Meade (PI), IMI, and Edwin Dickey (Co-PI), Instruction and Teacher Education, are awarded a three year National Science Foundation grant totaling $205,585 for their research on: Collaborative Research: Maplets for Calculus (M4C).

"The Maplets for Calculus (M4C) project, a Type 2 proposal, represents a continuation and expansion of the successful CCLI Phase I project with the same title. The overall goal of the M4C project is to provide a new, research-informed paradigm that assists students as they develop understanding of fundamental calculus concepts and master related algebraic skills. The cornerstone of the project is a suite of applets whose pedagogical benefits exceed the capabilities of existing on-line homework systems, textbooks and printed study guides. M4C v.1.3 is a collection of 129 Java applets on precalculus, single-variable calculus, and multivariable calculus topics. Main thrusts of this project are the addition of new maplets, the migration of M4C to mobile devices, its incorporation into an on-line text, and the improvement of the collection based on assessment of the applets, both individually and as a complete set."

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September 08, 2011
Endowed Chair Position Available
http://imi.cas.sc.edu/django/site_media/static/pdf/COEE.pdf

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July 18, 2011
Qi Wang, Xinfeng Liu and Xiaofeng Yang are awarded a SC EPSCoR/IDeA GEAR grant

IMI members Qi Wang (PI), Xinfeng Liu (Co-PI) and Xiaofeng Yang (Co-PI) are awarded a one year SC EPSCoR/IDeA GEAR Grant totaling $85,000 for their research on: Modeling and Simulation of Organ Biofabrication Processes. This award includes a subcontract to Voorhees College for collaborative research.

"Given the keen interest in understanding morphogenesis of functional 3-D tissues and organs and the complexity involved in fabricating branching vascular trees experimentally, we propose to develop a set of mathematical models and computational tools based on the models to probe the morphogenesis of the vascular construct in tissues and organs in various geometries and environment to assist design of an ”optimal” fabrication procedure or to explore the feasibility of certain ideal designs. This will be built upon a solid scientific understanding of the morphogenesis process during the fabrication and maturation of tissues and organs and will take into account various cellular dynamics including molecular level cellular communications and hydrodynamic interactions."

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June 16, 2011
NEH collaborative project is highlighted in "USC Times"
Download USC Times (June 16, 2011)

USC highlights the NEH funded collaborative research project between the Moving Image Research Collections (MIRC) and the Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute (IMI) in an article published in the June 16, 2011 issue of USC Times: "Old film plus new algorithms: new solutions for digitization." Drs. Petrushev and Karaivanov are working with MIRC faculty, Drs. Wilsbacher and Cooper, to develop an open-source software application that directly reproduces the optical sound tracks of motion picture films from digital scans. To view this article, please visit the link above and navigate to the bottom of page 1.

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April 12, 2011
The National Endowment for the Humanities awards grant to University Libraries and the Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute

Greg Wilsbacher (PI) and Mark Cooper (Co-PI), MIRC, and Pencho Petrushev (Co-PI) and Borislav Karaivanov (Co-PI), IMI, are awarded a three-year National Endowment for the Humanities grant totaling $300,000 for their research on: An Open Source Application for Image-Based Digital Reproduction of Optical Film Sound. Additional generous support, in the form of cost-share, is provided by University Libraries and the College of Arts and Sciences.

"The University of South Carolina Moving Image Research Collections (MIRC) is collaborating with research faculty from the University’s Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute (IMI) to develop an open-source software application to directly reproduce the optical sound tracks of motion picture films from digital scans.

We expect this process to be of widespread interest. Motion picture film records are an important primary resource for current and future research in the humanities. Feature-length fiction films may now be the most often studied films, but future scholars will have been poorly served if the nation does not preserve and make accessible as much of our non-theatrical film record as possible. Many facets of humanities studies will be incomplete if newsreel, local television news, industrial films, educational films, and other non-theatrical films are not converted into digital film for future study. Unlike their feature film cousins, films from these less glamorous areas have not been subject to widespread preservation or digital conversion efforts. Without inexpensive and widely available tools to the conversion to digital film files much of the nation’s film production will not survive into the digital age because the funding simply does not exist to convert our massive non-theatrical heritage in the same manner as our theatrically released heritage.

MIRC/IMI have successfully tested the feasibility of using computational solutions to reconstruct film-sound from digital scans created on the Kinetta. We envision a software solution that functions with almost any scanner meeting a few criteria. This would decrease the expense of digital conversion, thereby increasing the amount of non-theatrical films that will be accessible in the digital age."

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March 21, 2011
Brian Straughan of Durham University, UK, will present the Spring 2011 Distinguished Lecture

The Interdisciplinary Mathematics Institute is honored to present Brian Straughan of Durham University, UK, as the Spring 2011 Distinguished Lecturer. Straughan will give a talk on "Thermal Convection in Nanofluids," on March 29th from 3:30 - 4:30 PM in LeConte 412. For abstract information please visit our Distinguished Lectures page.

Brian Straughan is a Professor of Numerical Analysis at Durham University. Throughout his illustrious career, he has won numerous awards and recognitions. In 1986, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. In 1994, he was awarded a Max Planck Research Prize (100,000 Deutsch Marks) by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, for outstanding achievements in Applied Mathematics. In June 1995, Straughan was elected a Foreign Member of the Accademia di Scienze, Fisiche e Matematiche di Napoli. In May 2005, he received a Durham University Vice Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Doctoral Supervision. The Proceedings A of the Royal Society of London nominated Straughan a top referee for 2010. In January of this year, he was elected a Corresponding Member of the Accademia Peloritana dei Pericolanti, Messina.

Straughan’s field of research includes partial differential equations, scientific computing, and their applications to problems in the real world. He is involved with much work in stability of convection flows in porous media, structural stability questions for porous flow models, and analysis of chemotaxis models in biology. He is also involved with nonlinear stability questions in convection problems, especially by means of the energy method, and, in particular, with devising numerical methods for solving, by means of compound matrix techniques, Chebyshev tau techniques, finite element - spectral techniques and optimization methods, the multi-parameter eigenvalue problems which arise through these investigations. His recent numerical work in this context has also been examining finite element techniques employing combinations of integrals of Legendre and Chebyshev polynomials as basis functions."

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February 17, 2011
New Frontiers in Imaging and Sensing workshop starts February 17th

The IMI and the NanoCenter are jointly hosting a research workshop in Spring 2011 to continue collaborations in developing new imaging methods for electron microscopy with special emphasis on sparsity recovering and compressed sensing concepts. The scope of applications will be widened to other data acquisition methods such as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and tomography related image formation. This intensive workshop, moderated by Wolfgang Dahmen, is scheduled for February 17 - 22, 2011 and will bring together experts in relevant areas from material science, microscopy, mathematics and computer science. For more details please visit our New Frontiers in Imaging and Sensing page.

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January 21, 2011
4th Annual International Seminar Series starts January 21st

Under the leadership of Wolfgang Dahmen, RWTH Aachen, Germany, the IMI and the Nanocenter are jointly hosting lectures in its International Seminar Series 2011: "New Frontiers in Imaging and Sensing" from January 21- March 30, 2011. This seminar series is intended to compliment the workshop which will be held in February and follows the successful International Seminar Series held in Spring 2010 ("Imaging in Electron Microscopy II").

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