IMI Interdisciplinary Mathematics InstituteCollege of Arts and Sciences

Qi Wang

  • College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor
  • Department of Mathematics
  • University of South Carolina


Education

Ph.D. Mathematics The Ohio State University 1991
M.S. Mathematics The Ohio State University 1988
B.S. Mathematics Nankai University, Tianjin, China 1982

Experience

2013 – Present College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor Department of Mathematics, Univ. of South Carolina
2008 – Present Thrust Leader Theory, Modeling and Simulation, NanoCenter, Univ. of South Carolina
2008 – 2013 Professor Department of Mathematics, Univ. of South Carolina
2004 – 2007 Director Applied and Computational Mathematics Program, Florida State University
2003 – 2009 Professor Department of Mathematics, Florida State University
2001 – 2003 Associate Professor Department of Mathematics, Florida State University
1999 Visiting Associate Professor Department of Mathematics, Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
1997 – 2001 Associate Professor Department of Mathematical Sciences, Indiana University-Purdue University,
1991 – 1997 Assistant Professor Department of Mathematical Sciences, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis

Research

Research Interests

  • Applied and Computational Mathematics
  • Computational Fluid Dynamics and Rheology of Complex Fluids
  • Continuum Mechanics and Kinetic Theory
  • Multiscale Modeling and Computation of Soft Matter and Complex Fluids of Anisotropic Microstructures
  • Modeling and Computation of Complex Biological Fluids/Materials and Cellular Dynamics
  • Parallel and High Performance Computing in Heterogeneous Cyberinfrastructure

Current Projects

My research lab - Computational Nanoscience and Mathematical Modeling - is located in the NanoCenter at USC (SUM 103). Research here is focused on modeling and computation of soft matter and complex fluids with applications in biofluids and biomaterials. Many remarkable manmade materials are produced through processing of complex fluids. Due to their complex molecular compositions, configurations, and intra- as well as inter-molecular interaction, the materials may exhibit fascinating mesoscopic structures in equilibrium and transient which lead to extraordinary material properties. We are concerned with developing state-of-the-art mathematical and computer models, analysis, as well as cutting-edge simulation tools, to study the properties of the soft matter and complex fluids to gain further understanding of this fascinating phenomena. Current projects follow:

  • Developing multiscale theories for flows of polymer-liquid crystalline polymer blends and polymer-clay nanocomposites.
  • Modeling mesoscale morphology, pattern and texture formation in flows of the complex fluids.
  • Simulation of flows of the complex fluids in simple geometries (simple shear and elongation) as well as complex geometries (contraction and free surface flows).
  • Studying the biaxial liquid crystals (bent-core molecules), especially, the flow properties in shear and driven by external fields.
  • Multiscale modeling and computation of bio-fluids and biomaterials. Simulation of actin dynamics and self-assembly through high-performance computing.
  • High performance computing and parallel computing for complex systems.
  • Modeling and computation of cell dynamics and cell motility, biofilm flows.
  • Wave propagation in liquid crystal materials. Transport phenomena in nanocomposites. Nonlinear optics.

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Teaching Activities

Current Courses

  • Math 728A - Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics (Model Biol Sys I)

Previous Courses

  • Undergraduate Courses: Algebra, Finite Mathematics, Brief Survey of Calculus I, Algebra & Trigonometry I, II, Calculus for Technology I, II, Integrated Calculus & Analytical Geometry I, II, Calculus I & II, Multivariate Calculus, Linear Algebra & Differential Equations, Ordinary differential equations, Discrete Mathematics, Engineering Mathematics I, II, Elementary Partial Differential Equations I, II
  • Graduate Courses: Linear Algebra with Applications, Vector Calculus, Partial Differential Equations I, II, Applied Mathematics Methods I, II, Computational Methods I, II, Computational Methods for Partial Differential Equations I, II, Boundary Value Problems, Qualitative Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations, Mathematical Modeling, Numerical Linear Algebra, Wave propagation (linear and nonlinear waves), Modeling of Complex Fluids

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5 Selected Publications

  • Q. Wang, "A hydrodynamic theory of nematic liquid crystalline polymers of different configurations", Journal of Chemical Physics, 116 (2002), 9120-9136,
  • T. Y. Zhang, N. Cogan, and Q. Wang, "Phase Field Models for Biofilms. I. Theory and 1-D simulations," Siam Journal on Applied Math, 69 (3) (2008), 641-669.
  • T. Y. Zhang, N. Cogan, and Q. Wang, "Phase Field Models for Biofilms. II. 2-D Numerical Simulations of Biofilm-Flow Interaction," Communications in Computational Physics, 4 (2008), 72-101.
  • A. Kataoka, B. C. W. Tanner, J. M. Macpherson, X. Xu, Q. Wang, M. Reginier, T. Daniel and P. B. Chase, "Spatially explicit, nanomechanical models of the muscle half sarcomere: Implications for mechanical tuning in atrophy and fatigue," Acta Astronautica, 60 (2) (2007), pp 111-118.
  • Q. Wang and X. Yang, David Adalsteinsson, T. Elston, K. Jacobson, Maria Maryna, M. G. Forest, "Computational and Modeling Strategies for Cell Motility," to appear in the book COMPUTATIONAL MOLECULAR CELL MODELING, 2011.

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IMI Preprints and Seminars

IMI Preprints



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Curriculum Vitae

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